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Please note: The Frank Talk articles listed below contain historical material. The data provided was current at the time of publication. For current information regarding any of the funds mentioned in these presentations, please visit the appropriate fund performance page.

6 Reasons Why Texas Trumps All Other U.S. Economies
October 23, 2018

6 Reasons Why Texas Trumps All Other U.S. Economies

As many of you reading this know, I’m what you would call a Tex-Can. I was born and raised in Canada, but I’ve called Texas home for nearly 30 years. I can’t picture U.S. Global Investors headquartered anywhere else, even after traveling to all parts of the country and, indeed, the world. Texas just “gets it,” which is why I think CNBC recently named the $1.6 trillion economy the best state for business in 2018—the first time, in fact, a state has won four separate times since the network began ranking them 12 years ago.

Below are six reasons why I think Texas trumps all other U.S. economies.

1. Texas is a manufacturing powerhouse

Everything’s bigger in Texas, and that includes manufacturing. Last year, total manufacturing output from the Lone Star State was $226.16 billion, or about 10 percent of total U.S. manufacturing goods, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. The industry supports more than 865,000 jobs in Texas, or about 7.1 percent of its workforce. And the average annual compensation for manufacturing was $82,544, compared to $46,642 for all nonfarm jobs, which helps boost the state’s gross domestic product (GDP). Finally, at a time when global manufacturing expansion is slowing, the sector in Texas continues to grow at a healthy pace.

Texas manufacturing sector continues to expand
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2. Texas is the largest exporting state

Texas is also known as the top exporting state in the nation, responsible for almost 20 percent of total U.S. exports. And they continue to grow at an impressive rate. According to the Dallas Fed, Texas exports rose sharply in July and were up 16 percent year-to-date, or about three times faster than U.S. exports, which increased 5.2 percent for the same period. Much of the growth in the Lone Star State is due to its monster oil and gas industry, which exported more crude than it imported for the first time ever in April, according to an August report by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

Texas is the top exporting state
click to enlarge

3. Texans enjoy the fastest income growth in the U.S.

Thanks to a robust business environment, and the fact that it’s one of only four states without a corporate income tax, Texas residents enjoyed the fastest personal income growth this year between the first and second quarter. According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), incomes expanded a whopping 6 percent in the June quarter, compared to 4.2 percent for Americans on average. This was the best rate among all 50 states. Earnings increases were led by professional, scientific and technical services.

Texas ranked first in income growth
click to enlarge

4. Texas is a global oil superpower

In case you haven’t heard, Texas is oil country—the number one producer in the U.S., accounting for more than 40 percent of national output—and that’s been a blessing for the state’s economy. Employment in oil and gas has led growth among its major sectors. Since Congress removed the crude oil export ban, oil and gas exports have gone from making up 5.2 percent of state exports to the largest share at 18 percent, or $45 billion over the past 12 months, according to the Dallas Fed. Investment bank HSBC now predicts that Texas will surpass OPEC members Iran and Iraq next year to become the world’s number three oil producer, accounting for over half of U.S. production.

Texas now accounts for over 40 percent of US oil production
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5. Everyone wants to move to Texas

Two years ago I wrote a piece about how everyone wants to move to Texas, and since then nothing’s changed. People still want to move here. Can you blame them? Of the top 10 fastest growing cities in terms of population, four were in Texas, according to the Census Bureau. In the number one spot was San Antonio, home to U.S. Global Investors. Between July 2016 and July 2017, the Alamo City attracted more than 24,000 new residents, and it now boasts some 1.5 million people. If we look at the fastest-growing U.S. cities by percent change, Texas takes half of the top 10 spots. In numbers one, two and three are the Texas cities of Frisco (8.2 percent growth), New Braunfels (8 percent) and Pflugerville (6.5 percent).

Four of the top fastest growing US cities are in Texas
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6. Everyone wants a Texas home

More residents means more demand for housing. The Lone Star State mostly avoided the house price bubble a decade ago, according to the Dallas Fed. As such, housing markets are currently tight in most of the state, and median prices remain near record highs. Texas A&M University’s Real Estate Center reports that sales grew 3.8 percent in July, reaching a record level of 29,456 homes sold through a multiple listing service (MLS). What’s more, Texas was the national leader in home permits, accounting for 16 percent of the U.S. total.

Housing sales in Texas have outpaced those in the US
click to enlarge

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All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.

America's Top States For Business CNBC, a division of NBC Universal, has been ranking state business climates annually since 2007. CNBC's state rankings are based on 10 categories: Cost of Doing Business, Workforce, Quality of Life, Infrastructure, Economy, Education, Technology & Innovation, Business, Friendliness, Access to Capital and Cost of Living.

The Dallas Fed conducts the monthly Texas Manufacturing Outlook Survey (TMOS) to obtain a timely assessment of the state's factory activity. Firms are asked whether output, employment, orders, prices and other indicators increased, decreased or remained unchanged over the previous month.

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Here's How Hungary Reduced Risk Without Forfeiting Returns
October 22, 2018

Heres what Hungary just did to reduce risk without hurting returns

Hungary isn’t known today as one of the world’s top gold producing countries. There was a time, though, when it accounted for around three-quarters of Europe’s entire output of the yellow metal, if you can believe it. According to historian Peter Sugar’s A History of Hungary, the central European country was a “veritable El Dorado” in the 14th century, and its gold pieces circulated widely across the entire continent, competing with those minted in Italy and England.

It was this rich mining heritage that Hungary’s central bank evoked when it announced last week its decision to increase gold holdings tenfold, from 3.1 metric tons to 31.5 tons, taking gold’s share of total reserves to 4.4 percent. (Gold accounts for 73.5 percent of U.S. reserves, by comparison, the most of any country.) Hungarian central bank governor Gyorgy Matolcsy described the move as one of “economic and national strategic importance,” adding that the extra gold made the country’s reserves “safer” and “reduced risk.” This is the first time since 1986 that Hungary has increased its gold holdings.   

Hungary just boosted its gold reserves tenfold
click to enlarge

The country isn’t alone in its mission to diversify. This month we also learned that Poland became the first European Union (EU) member to increase its gold reserves in two decades. The Eastern European country added as much as 9 metric tons of hard assets between July and August of this year. Central banks in Russia, Turkey and Kazakhstan have also kept up their gold buying, representing close to 90 percent of the activity we’ve seen this year.

Meanwhile, the EU has continued to print paper money.

For more, watch emerging Europe analyst Joanna Sawicka’s full explanation by clicking here.

A Good Store of Value

So why should banks—or investors, for that matter—be interested in boosting their gold holdings? One reason is timing. Until recently, gold prices have been relatively affordable, trading at 52-week lows of around $1,180 an ounce in mid-August and at the end of September. Central banks’ investment was wisely made. From those lows, gold is now up more than 4 percent on stock volatility.

Check out the chart below. I think it’s fascinating to see the relationship between dramatic moves in the stock market and people’s interest in gold. When stocks sold off a couple of weeks ago, Google searches for “gold price” jumped to their highest in at least a month. This shows, I believe, that people recognize gold as a good store of value when market volatility reemerges.

Spike in Google searches for gold price corresponding with stock selloff
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Gold Has Helped Improve a Portfolio’s Risk-Adjusted Returns

Returning to what Hungarian central bank governor Matolcsy said about risk reduction, a certain amount of gold has been shown to improve a portfolio’s Sharpe ratio, according to the World Gold Council’s (WGC) most recent Gold Investor. The Sharpe ratio, in case you’re unaware, measures a portfolio’s risk-adjusted returns relative to its peers, based on standard deviation. The higher the ratio is over its peers, the better the risk-adjusted returns.

Performance of an institutional portfolio with or without gold
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Analysts at New Frontier Advisors found that an institutional portfolio with a 6 percent weighting in gold had a higher Sharpe ratio than one without any gold exposure. This means that volatility was reduced without hurting returns.

Although analysts were looking at Chinese portfolios in particular, the WGC’s Fred Yang believes these findings can just as easily be applied to portfolios that are invested in U.S.-, European- or U.K.-listed assets. The “research indicates,” Yang says, “that most well-balanced portfolios would benefit from a modest allocation to gold.”

I’ve often advocated for a 10 percent Golden Rule—with 5 percent in bullion, the other 5 percent in gold stocks—and so New Frontier’s research is illuminating. It also helps explain Hungary and Poland’s actions, as well as those of other net purchasers of gold.

Holding Firm Against Rising Treasury Yields

I’ve shown many times in the past that the price of gold is inversely related with real rates. The yellow metal has especially struggled when Treasury yields have outpaced inflation.

Gold price has remained strong despite a rising 2 year treasury yield
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The two-year Treasury yield, for instance, is just under 3 percent today, a more-than-10-year high. Because consumer prices are rising at 2.3 percent year-over-year, according to the latest report from the Labor Department, the two-year has a positive real yield—and this has historically weighed on gold.

You would think, then, that its price would be much lower than it is. I’m impressed with how well it’s held up.

Get more of my thoughts on gold’s performance by watching the latest Frank Talk Live! View it by clicking here!

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

Standard deviation is a measure of the dispersion of a set of data from its mean. The more spread apart the data, the higher the deviation. Standard deviation is also known as historical volatility.

The S&P 500 Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index of 500 common stock prices in U.S. companies.

Diversification does not protect an investor from market risks and does not assure a profit.

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Take a Peek at What the Top 1 Percent Have in Savings
October 17, 2018

take a peek at what the top 1 percent in savings

You’ve likely seen the reports: A whopping 44 percent of Americans wouldn’t be able to afford a $400 emergency expense without borrowing it or selling something. That’s according to the Federal Reserve’s findings in 2017. And earlier this year, financial services firm Bankrate reported that only 39 percent of Americans would be able to pay off an unexpected expense of $1,000 from their savings alone.

These figures have long-term implications. When someone doesn’t have enough in their savings account to cover an unexpected $400 to $1,000 emergency, it raises questions about how prepared they are for retirement.

So how does your savings account stack up to the average American’s? How about the top 1 percent’s? And just as a reminder, the entry point to the highest of earnings brackets is “only” $480,930 a year, according to 2015 income tax data.

How Does Your Savings Account Stack Up?

Personal finance firm MagnifyMoney recently looked at how much Americans have in savings, based on income level. As of June 2018, the average U.S. household has $175,510 in savings, including bank and retirement accounts. Compare that to the average household in the top 1 percent, which has close to $2.5 million in savings.

These are averages, remember. If we look at medians, or the middle values of savings accounts, these numbers change dramatically. According to MagnifyMoney, the median American household has only $11,700 in the bank. This means that half of the approximately 126 million U.S. households have more than this, while the other half has less. The median top 1 percent savings account, by comparison, holds just under $1.2 million.

It’s clear that too few working-age Americans are preparing for retirement adequately, and many who are retired worry that they won’t be able to maintain the lifestyle they desire. According to the most recent Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) survey on retirement confidence, only 32 percent of retirees—nearly a third—said they felt “very confident” in their ability to live comfortably during their years outside the workforce.

Not Your Father’s CDs

Besides not having enough in savings, many Americans aren’t doing enough to grow their wealth. Back when interest rates were close to 20 percent, thanks to former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, yields on certificates of deposit (CDs) were attractive enough that many households favored them over riskier assets such as stocks.

Today, however, CDs—though protected by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)—just don’t yield enough to justify locking your money up for any period of time.

certificates of deposit rates have been slow to recover
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Now let’s take a look at the stock market. The S&P 500 Index is up almost 200 percent from 10 years ago. The compound annual growth rate (CAGR), then, is 11.6 percent. With dividends reinvested, the CAGR becomes 13.9 percent.

There’s a reason why Albert Einstein allegedly called compound interest the greatest invention in human history.

Too Few People Are Participating

The problem is that too few Americans have participated in this bull market. Of the bottom half of U.S. earners, only about a third own stocks, according to Fed estimates. Perhaps not surprisingly, the more a household earns, the more likely it is to invest in the stock market.

percent of US households owning $10,000 or more in stock by wealth class
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Take a look at the chart above, based on data produced by American economist Edward Wolff. Of U.S. households that rank in the top 1 percent, nearly 94 percent own $10,000 or more in equities. From there, the ownership rate drops off. Less than 5 percent of the bottom 20 percent of earners have $10,000 or more invested in the stock market, either directly or indirectly. Only 35 percent of all American households do.

If you ask someone why they’re not invested, chances are they’ll say that it’s too risky. It’s easy to see why they might feel this way, especially after the huge selloff last week.

Stocks Have Been Up for the 10-Year Period

But when you have a long-term view—10 years or more, for instance—investing in the stock market looks very attractive. As my friend Marc Lichtenfeld put it during an interview back in August, stocks have historically been up for the 10-year period.

In fact, the only two times when stocks weren’t up for the 10-year period, according to Marc, were “the middle of the Great Depression and in 2008-2009 during the Great Recession. You would literally need to cash out in the middle of historic downturn not to make money over 10 years, and that’s if you sold right at the bottom. If you had waited another year or two, you might have come out at least breaking even, if not better.”

Cost is another reason some people aren’t invested—but it doesn’t have to be a barrier. With the ABC Investment Plan, investors can invest a fixed amount in a specific investment at regular intervals. The minimum investment with the ABC Investment Plan is just $1,000 initially and then $100 per month.

Learn more about the ABC Investment Plan by clicking here.

 

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

The CD interest rate is typically fixed and payable on a set maturity date. The CD rate and principal are typically insured up to $250K.

The Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS) is the longest-running survey of its kind, measuring worker and retiree confidence about retirement, and is conducted by the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) and independent research firm Greenwald & Associates.

The S&P 500 Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index of 500 common stock prices in U.S. companies.

The ABC Investment Plan doesn’t assure a profit or protect against loss in a declining market. You should evaluate your ability to continue in such a program in view of the possibility that you may have to redeem fund shares in periods of declining share prices as well as in periods of rising prices.

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October Doesn't Disappoint: Volatility Is Back After a Tranquil Third Quarter
October 15, 2018

october doesn't disappoint volatility is back after a tranquil third quarter

According to the 2018 edition of the Stock Trader’s Almanac, October has been a “great” time to buy. Once ranked last in terms of stock performance, the 10th month has delivered relatively average returns since 1950. What makes it so attractive is that it’s followed by November and December, historically among the very best months for stocks. We’re also entering the three most bullish quarters of the four-year presidential cycle, based on 120 years of stock market data.

average monthly s and p 500 index returns
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At the same time, October is sometimes known as the “jinx month” because an inordinate number of huge selloffs have occurred in the month, including those in 1929 and 1987. The worst month of the global financial meltdown was October 2008, when stocks gave up close to 17 percent.

There have been only six trading days in S&P 500 Index history in which stocks sold off by eight or more standard deviations, according to a report last week by Goldman Sachs. Last Wednesday was one of those six days, the fifth largest in history, following trading days in September 1955, October 1989, October 1987 and February 2007. The selloff in 1955, interestingly enough, was prompted by news that President Dwight Eisenhower had suffered a heart attack.

If you’ve read my whitepaper “Managing Expectations,” you should know that eight standard deviations (or more) represents a massive, exceedingly rare variance from the mean. Days like last Wednesday remind us of the importance of diversification into assets that have little to no correlation with stocks—assets such as municipal bonds and gold.

Gold Helped Investors Stanch the Losses

I was impressed with how well gold did last week. The yellow metal behaved exactly as you would expect it to, edging up slightly on safe haven demand Wednesday as stocks—large and small, domestic and foreign—tumbled.

gold price stood up against the rout
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On Thursday, the spread between gold and equities was even more pronounced, with gold closing almost 3 percent higher and the S&P 500 ending down more than 2 percent, below its 200-day moving average.

Wednesday’s laggards included big-name tech firms such as Apple, Amazon and Netflix. Combined, these three companies lost nearly $120 billion in market value on that day alone.

technology stocks had their worst day since august 2011
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As I shared with you last month, e-commerce is the second largest equity bubble of the last four decades following housing. E-commerce is also vastly overpresented in indexes, meaning extraordinary amounts of money have flowed into a very small number of stocks by way of passive index funds that track them.

Apple alone is featured in almost 210 indexes. Consequentially, when the iPhone-maker’s stock plummets 4.5 percent or more, as it did last Wednesday, a huge percentage of investors are affected.

Again, this is one of the reasons why I advocate the Golden Rule—a 10 percent weighting in the yellow metal, with 5 percent in bullion and gold jewelry, the other 5 percent in high-quality gold stocks, mutual funds and ETFs.

The Return of Volatility

Last week the CBOE Volatiliy Index (VIX), sometimes called the “fear gauge,” had its biggest one-day surge since February. But after such a tranquil third quarter, a substantial move in either direction might have been anticipated. LPL Financial Research reports that this year was the first time since 1963 that the normally volatile third quarter didn’t  have a single one-day jump of more than 1 percent, up or down.

“Volatility is back and it may require more active strategies on the part of investors to pursue their long-term goals,” LPL Financial’s chief investment strategist, John Lynch, said.

Higher Rates Reflective of a Strong Economy

In response to the selloff, President Donald Trump put the blame squarely at the feet of the Federal Reserve, saying it’s “ridiculous what they’re doing” and calling monetary policy “too tight.”

The Fed is indeed tightening, and I’ve pointed out before that rate hike cycles in the past have preceded market downturns. But calling policy “too tight” at the moment might be a stretch. After being hiked yet again last month, the federal funds rate stands at 2.25 percent. That’s up considerably from near-zero—which is where it remained during much of Barack Obama’s two terms as president—but it’s still historically low, not yet having reached the long-term average of 4.82 percent.

Fed funds rate still at an historically low level
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It must also be said that higher rates are reflective of a strong economy—something Trump has fought hard for. In the second quarter, U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) grew 4.2 percent, its fastest pace since 2014, and the Atlanta Fed is now forecasting the same for the third quarter. Unemployment is currently at a multi-decade low, wage growth hit a nine-year high of 2.9 percent in August and median household income in 2017 climbed to $61,372, the most on record. U.S. consumer confidence, as measured by the Conference Board, reached an 18-year high in September.

The private sector is also seeing healthy expansion. S&P 500 companies are expected to report earnings growth above 20 percent for the third straight quarter, according to FactSet. Stocks rebounded Friday morning after a number of companies reported earnings that surprised to the upside. Delta Air Lines, for example, beat expectations, with net income in the third quarter coming in at $1.31 billion, or $1.91 a share, up from $1.16 billion, or $1.61 a share, in the same three months last year.

Although stocks appear to be stabilizing somewhat, I think the two-day selloff last week should be enough to convince investors to make sure they have a 10 percent weighting in gold and gold stocks, with allocations to municipal bonds and ultrashort government bonds.

Find out why so many investors are flocking to U.S. Treasuries. Watch the video by clicking here!

 

The S&P 500 is a stock market index that tracks the stocks of 500 large-cap U.S. companies. The Russell 2000 Index is a small-cap stock market index of the bottom 2,000 stocks in the Russell 3000 Index. The Bloomberg Commodity Index (BCOM) is a highly liquid and diversified benchmark for commodity investments. The MSCI Emerging Markets Index captures large and mid-cap representation across 24 Emerging Markets (EM) countries. The U.S. Dollar Index is an index of the value of the United States dollar relative to a basket of foreign currencies, often referred to as a basket of U.S. trade partners' currencies. The Dow Jones U.S. Technology Index measures the performance of the technology sector of the U.S. equity market. The CBOE Volatility Index, known by its ticker symbol lVIX, is a popular measure of the stock market's expectation of volatility implied by S&P 500 index options, calculated and published by the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE). The Consumer Confidence Index (CCI) Survey is an index by The Conference Board that measures how optimistic or pessimistic consumers are with respect to the economy in the near future.

Standard deviation is a measure of the dispersion of a set of data from its mean. The more spread apart the data, the higher the deviation. Standard deviation is also known as historical volatility.

Diversification does not protect an investor from market risks and does not assure a profit.

Fund portfolios are actively managed, and holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more of U.S. Global Investors Funds as of 9/30/2018: Delta Air Lines Inc.

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.

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5 Charts That Show Why Gold Belongs in Your Portfolio Now
October 9, 2018

5 charts that show why gold belongs in your profile in gold we trust report 2018

The annual “In Gold We Trust” report by Liechtenstein-based investment firm Incrementum is a must-read account of the gold market, and its just-released chartbook for the 2018 edition is no exception.

The strengthening U.S. dollar has lately dented the price of gold, and rising interest rates are making some yield-bearing financial assets more attractive as a safe haven. But as Incrementum shows, there are many risks right now that favor owning gold in your portfolio.

Below I’ve selected five of the most compelling charts that highlight why I think you need gold in your portfolio now.

1. The End of Easy Money

To offset the effects of the global financial crisis a decade ago, central banks increased liquidity by slashing interest rates and buying trillions of dollars’ worth of government securities. Now, however, it looks as though banks are ready to start tightening, and no one is really quite sure what the consequences will be. The Federal Reserve was the first, in late 2015, to begin hiking rates, and it’s been steadily shrinking its balance sheet for about a year now. Other banks are set to follow suit. According to Incrementum, the tide will turn sometime next year, with global liquidity finally set to turn negative. In the past, recessions and bear markets were preceded by central bank tightening cycles, so it might be a good idea to consider adding gold and gold stocks, which have historically done well in times of economic and financial turmoil.    

central banks to withdraw liquidity from financial markets for the first time since crisis
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2. Banks on a Gold-Buying Spree

While I’m on this subject, central banks have been net purchasers of gold since 2010, with China, Russia, Turkey and India responsible for much of the activity. Just this week, I shared with you the news that Poland added as much as nine metric tons to its reserves this past summer. If gold is such a “barbarous relic,” why are they doing this? As Incrementum writes, “The increase in gold reserves should be seen as strong evidence of growing distrust in the dominance of the U.S. dollar and the global monetary system associated with it.” Having a 10 percent weighting in gold and gold stocks could likewise help you diversify away from fiat currencies and monetary policy.

change in gold reserves held by emerging countries from 2007 to 2017
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3. Too Much Debt

Everywhere you look, debt is rising to historic highs, whether it’s emerging market debt, student loan debt or U.S. government debt. Meanwhile, higher rates are making it more expensive to service all this debt. As you can see below, interest payments will hit a record $500 billion this year. It’s forecast that the federal deficit will not only reach but exceed $1 trillion in 2019. How will this end? Earlier this year, I called this risk the “global ticking debt bomb,” and I still believe it’s one of the most compelling reasons to maintain some exposure to gold.   

US government debt outstanding continues to rise rapidly
click to enlarge

4. An Exceptional Store of Value

In U.S. dollar-denominated terms, the price of gold is down right now. But in Turkey, Venezuela, Argentina and other countries whose currencies have weakened substantially in recent months, the precious metal is soaring. This alone should be reason enough to have part of your wealth stored in gold. Need further proof? According to a recent Bloomberg article, the cost of a black-market passport in Venezuela right now is around $2,000. That’s more than 125,000 bolivars, or 68 times the monthly minimum wage. A Venezuelan family that had the prudence to own gold would be in a much better position today to survive or escape President Nicolas Maduro’s corrupt regime. In extraordinary circumstances such as this, the yellow metal can literally help save your life.

gold does exactly what it is supposed to do protect purchasing power gold price increases in turkish lira and venezuelan bolivar
click to enlarge

5. A Sterling Time to Buy Gold?

Finally, a word about timing. According to Incrementum, some of the best gold buying opportunities have been when the gold/silver ratio crossed above 80—that is, when it took 80 or more ounces of silver to buy one ounce of gold. If you look at the chart below, you’ll see that such instances occurred in 2003, 2009 and late 2015/early 2016—all ideal times to accumulate. We see a similar buying opportunity today, with the gold/silver ratio at a high of 83 as of October 8. What’s more, gold stocks are the cheapest they’ve been in more than 20 years relative to the S&P 500 Index.

highs in the gold silver ratio were great buying opportunities for gold
click to enlarge

Curious to learn more? Download my popular whitepaper on gold’s love trade by clicking here!

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

The S&P 500 Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index of 500 common stock prices in U.S. companies.

Diversification does not protect an investor from market risks and does not assure a profit.

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Net Asset Value
as of 02/15/2019

Global Resources Fund PSPFX $4.59 0.03 Gold and Precious Metals Fund USERX $7.51 0.15 World Precious Minerals Fund UNWPX $2.94 0.05 China Region Fund USCOX $8.11 -0.07 Emerging Europe Fund EUROX $6.48 0.05 All American Equity Fund GBTFX $24.03 0.18 Holmes Macro Trends Fund MEGAX $16.80 0.16 Near-Term Tax Free Fund NEARX $2.20 No Change U.S. Government Securities Ultra-Short Bond Fund UGSDX $2.00 No Change