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Please note: The Frank Talk articles listed below contain historical material. The data provided was current at the time of publication. For current information regarding any of the funds mentioned in these presentations, please visit the appropriate fund performance page.

Are Trump's Steel and Aluminum Tariffs Good for America?
March 5, 2018

Gold and the ticking time bomb of debt

President Donald Trump’s proposed tariff on imported steel and aluminum, at 25 percent and 10 percent, is much more than a shot across the bow. Indeed, this could be the official kickoff of the trade war we all anticipated. The protectionist trade policy, announced last week as the president met with metals executives, raised fresh inflation worries and had an immediate impact on capital markets.

As expected, the winners were domestic steelmakers. AK Steel, the only manufacturer in North America that produces carbon, stainless and electrical steels, rose as much as 9.5 percent Thursday.

US steelmakers surged on Trump tariff news
click to enlarge

AK Steel CEO Roger Newport praised Trump’s decision, saying he fully supports “the actions he plans to take to stem the tide of unfairly traded steel imports that threaten the national security of our country.”

Newport wasn’t alone. Drew Wilcox, vice president of steel giant Nucor, called the tariffs “a clear message to foreign competitors that dumping steel products into our market will no longer be tolerated.”

Among the biggest losers from the news were automakers, which account for a little more than a quarter of steel demand in the U.S., according to the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI). That makes the industry the second-largest consumer following construction. Ford, General Motors and Fiat Chrysler all fell more than 2 percent Thursday, and losses extended into Friday.

Get Ready for Higher Consumer Prices

Foreign trading partners could target American made goods such as bourbon after Trump imposes tariffs on steel and aluminum

To be clear, this is a huge deal, with serious inflationary implications. The U.S. is the world's largest steel importer, so it's very possible we could see retaliation from multiple trading partners on exports ranging from Florida orange juice to Kentucky bourbon to Wisconsin cheese. It's hard to imagine a scenario where this is not passed on to consumers.

Trump was reportedly advised to exempt select allies, but it appears he's chosen a no-exemptions option. Canada, the top supplier of steel and aluminum to the U.S., was spared in 2002 when former President George W. Bush imposed tariffs as high as 30 percent on steel.

When a country (USA) is losing many billions of dollars on trade with virtually every country it does business with, trade wars are good, and easy to win, President Trump tweeted Friday morning.

The country with which the U.S. has the biggest trade deficit is China. In 2017, the deficit stood at $375 billion, which accounts for about 65 percent of the total U.S. trade deficit. The tariff on steel and aluminum should have a negligible impact, however, as the U.S. imports a relatively small percent of those metals from China.

Gold Has Done Well in Times of High Inflation

As I’ve explained numerous times before, one of the most prudent ways investors have positioned their portfolios in times of rising inflation is by adding to their gold exposure.

The chart below, courtesy of the World Gold Council (WGC), shows that annual gold returns were around 15 percent on average in years when inflation was 3 percent or higher year-over-year, between 1970 and 2017. In real, or inflation-adjusted, terms, returns were closer to 8 percent. This is still higher, though, than average returns in years when inflation was lower.

Gold has historically rallied in periods of high inflation
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According to the WGC, "gold returns have outpaced the U.S. consumer price index (CPI) over the long run, due to its many sources of demand. Gold has not just preserved capital, it has helped it grow."

The most recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) shows that consumer prices rose 2.1 percent year-over-year in January, but as I said earlier, real inflation could be grossly understated. 

To learn more about how gold could be the solution to high inflation, click here!

My Journey Through the Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies

Gold and metals were definitely top of mind last week at BMO Capital Markets Global Metals & Mining Conference, held in sunny Hollywood, Florida. I had the pleasure to be on a panel at the four-day event, which was attended by more than 1,500 curious investors and advisors, representing approximately 500 different organizations from 35 countries.

The panel I was on focused on blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies, which are reshaping how transactions are made and how companies raise funds across the globe. Startups raised more than $1.5 billion in February, the third straight month for initial coin offerings (ICOs) to generate over $1 billion.

ICOs have raised more than 1 billion for past three months
click to enlarge

Last year, $6.5 billion was raised through ICOs, according to Token Report, and it looks as if that amount will be exceeded in just the first few months of 2018. As I wrote back in October, more and more companies are opting to raise funds through ICOs instead of going public to bypass many of the restrictive rules and costs associated with getting listed on an exchange. And unlike with private equity, smaller retail investors can participate, though I must stress that this is a very speculative trade.

The head of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), Jay Clayton, strongly agrees with that last point. In December, he issued a statement explaining why he believes certain ICOs should fall under the jurisdiction of federal securities law and, as such, be filed beforehand.

Up until this point, the agency has taken few actions, but it appears it’s ready to start getting more aggressive against fraud. The Wall Street Journal reported last week that the SEC has issued “dozens” of subpoenas and information requests to cryptocurrency firms and advisors.

You might think this would hurt cryptocurrencies, but the prices of a number of them were up following the news. Bitcoin jumped nearly 6 percent on Thursday, as the token has often been seen as a "safe haven" in the cryptocurrency market.

HIVE Involved in Minting Virgin Coins

As many of you reading this know, U.S. Global Investors made a strategic investment in HIVE Blockchain Technologies in September, and as of today, it remains the only publicly-listed company that’s engaged in the mining of virgin tokens. HIVE and its partner Genesis Mining—the world’s largest cloud bitcoin mining company—are the leading miners and owners of Ether, the “crypto-fuel” for the Ethereum network. None of these assets has been used in any transaction, just as a newly-minted U.S. dollar, hot off the press, has never been used.

I continue to be optimistic about cryptocurrencies and see a very bright future for blockchain technology. The sentiment was similarly good among many of the attendees of last week's conference. It's only just the beginning.

For timely, expert commentary on metals and mining, gold, cryptocurrencies and more, subscribe to our award-winning Investor Alert by clicking here!


The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is one of the most widely recognized price measures for tracking the price of a market basket of goods and services purchased by individuals. The weights of components are based on consumer spending patterns.

The S&P 500 Stock Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index of 500 common stock prices in U.S. companies.

Frank Holmes has been appointed non-executive chairman of the Board of Directors ofHIVE Blockchain Technologies. Both Mr. Holmes and U.S. Global Investors own shares of HIVE, directly and indirectly.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. None of the securities mentioned in the article were held by any accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of 12/31/2017.

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The World's Cobalt Supply Is in Jeopardy
February 27, 2018

Cobalt produced globally batteries power consumer electronics electronic vehicles

Disney’s Black Panther is in theaters right now, breaking all kinds of box office records and wowing audiences. The film features a fictional, highly-advanced African country known as Wakanda, whose vast wealth and prosperity are derived almost exclusively from the mining of a rare, fantastical metal called vibranium.

In its own colorful way, Black Panther does an excellent job dramatizing mining’s important role in supplying the world with much-needed raw materials. Vibranium is the basis for everything in the film, from the title character’s flashy superhero suit to Wakanda’s otherworldly infrastructure and vehicles, to its futuristic medicine and weaponry.

Like Wakanda, the real Africa is rich in minerals and metals, many of them extremely valuable. Think platinum and palladium in South Africa, diamonds in Botswana, copper in Zambia and cobalt in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Unfortunately, many African countries have not been managed as well as the one depicted in the film. Corruption and fiscal instability, coupled with inconsistencies in taxation and mining policies, make operating on the continent challenging for foreign producers, to say the least. Three years ago, I argued that Africa could mine its way to prosperity if only it addressed the hindrances that keep explorers and producers away. I stand by those words today.

Consider Congo, which produces roughly two-thirds of the world’s cobalt, an essential component in lithium-ion batteries. Lawmakers there recently voted to raise taxes and royalties on profits and metals produced. That includes cobalt, whose price has soared 180 percent in the past three years on red-hot electric vehicle (EV) demand. The country’s state-owned mining company, Gécamines SA, is also pushing the government to renationalize the entire mining industry.

CObalt prices continue to surge on electric car demand
click to enlarge

Admittedly, the fictional Wakanda appears to have a nationalized metals and mining sector. But because the country is so advanced and self-sustaining, it has no need for outside investment. That’s not the case with many real-life African nations, which are literally, in some cases, sitting on a gold mine.

Cobalt Supply Shortage Could Boost Prices Even More

But let’s focus on cobalt for a moment. Global demand for the brittle, bluish-white metal has skyrocketed in recent months, exceeding 100,000 metric tons for the first time last year, according to mining consultant CRU Group. Over the next 10 years, it’s projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 11.6 percent.

And because around two-thirds of the world’s supply is mined in the highly unstable Congo, a supply shortage is likely brewing.

“There just isn’t enough cobalt to go around,” George Heppel, a CRU consultant, told Bloomberg in January. “The auto companies that’ll be the most successful in maintaining long-term stability in terms of raw materials will be the ones that purchase the cobalt and then supply that to their battery manufacturers.”

Cobalt use in electric vehicles and other lithium ion battery apllications
click to enlarge

Apple to Buy Cobalt Directly from Miners

Automakers aren’t the only ones with this idea. Bloomberg reported last week that Apple, the world’s largest end user of cobalt, is in talks to buy the metal directly from miners. The move would help the iPhone-maker not only save many billions of dollars in the long term but also be more transparent about how the metal is sourced, as there have been concerns about illegal mining operations and the use of child labor.  

Details are scarce at this point, but Bloomberg writes that “Apple is seeking contracts to secure several thousand metric tons of cobalt a year for five years or longer.”

One of the miners the company is rumored to be speaking with is Switzerland-based Glencore, the 14th largest company in the world by revenue as of 2016, according to the Fortune Global 500. This would make sense, as Glencore—the best-performing London-listed miner last year, finishing up 41 percent—has been positioning itself as the go-to supplier of cobalt and other metals that are used in so-called clean tech, including copper, nickel, and zinc.

Glencore Announces $2.9 Billion in Dividends in 2018

Glencore stock jumped more than 5 percent last Wednesday after the company reported phenomenal performance in 2017 that CEO Ivan Glasenberg describes as “our strongest on record.” Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) rose 44 percent year-over-year, from $10.3 billion to $14.8 billion, led by higher commodity prices and “enhanced” mining margins.

Sure to make investors happy, the company also declared a distribution of $2.9 billion, or $0.20 per share, to be paid in two installments this year.

The earnings report made no mention of Apple—or smartphones, for that matter—but it did emphasize the high rate of growth in electric vehicle investment, which is expected to greatly benefit cobalt demand.

“Global automaker investments now total more than $90 billion, with at least $19 billion attributed to the U.S., $21 billion to China and $52 billion to Germany,” Glasenberg writes. “Volkswagen alone plans to spend $40 billion by 2030 to build electrified versions of over 300 models.”

Over the next three years, Glencore’s cobalt production growth is projected at 133 percent, followed by nickel at 30 percent and copper at 25 percent.

This year alone, the company believes it will produce as much as 39,000 metric tons of cobalt, up 42 percent from 27,400 tons last year.

Curious about investment opportunities in cobalt and other natural resources? Click here!

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is one of the most widely recognized price measures for tracking the price of a market basket of goods and services purchased by individuals. The weights of components are based on consumer spending patterns.

There is no guarantee that the issuers of any securities will declare dividends in the future or that, if declared, will remain at current levels or increase over time.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of 12/31/2017: Glencore PLC.

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Is American Energy on the Verge of a New Golden Age?
February 13, 2018

Oil rig

The U.S. has been a net importer of energy since 1953, but that’s set to change early next decade, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). In its highly anticipated Annual Energy Outlook 2018, the agency forecasts that the U.S. will become a net exporter of energy by as early as 2022, thanks in large part to the boom in shale oil and liquefied natural gas (LNG) production as well as the relaxation of export restrictions. A “golden age of American energy dominance,” as President Donald Trump described it back in June, could be upon us sooner than anticipated, putting the U.S. on a path to dethrone Saudi Arabia and Russia as the world’s top oil powerhouse.

US forecast to become a net exporter of energy by 2022
click to enlarge

The 40-year-old ban restricting U.S. oil exports was lifted in December 2015, and between then and October 2017, exports skyrocketed nearly 300 percent.

A US oil export boom 40 years in the making
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This has galvanized shale producers into doubling their efforts to meet growing demand. Earlier in the month, I told you the U.S. produced more than 10 million barrels of oil per day in November for the first time since 1970. And in the week ended February 9, the number of active North American oil rigs rose sharply from 765 to 791, the most in nearly three years.

North America Expected to Drive Global Growth

The EIA’s forecast is in line with those of independent analysts, who see the U.S., along with Canada, dominating global growth in well demand.

“North American shale activity is the primary mechanism driving growth globally,” writes energy consulting firm Rystad Energy in its January global well market outlook. The group adds that the number of wells “completed in North America increased 40 percent in 2017, and we expect 11 percent average annual growth toward 2020.”

North American shale activity expected to drive global well demand
click to enlarge

Sign of the Times: U.S. Import Terminal Preparing for First-Ever Exports

From Texas ports, the U.S. now exports crude to as many as 30 countries, seizing valuable market share from members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). Since November, China has become the largest consumer of U.S. crude other than Canada, according to Reuters. (Last year, in fact, China surpassed the U.S. to become the world’s largest overall importer of oil.) And in a surprising move that shows how the rise of American shale is reshaping the global market, the United Arab Emirates, a significant oil producer in its own right, purchased 700,000 barrels of oil from the U.S. in December, Bloomberg reports.

For the first time ever the Louisiana offshore oil port LOOP will export US crude

Now, for the first time ever, exports are set to be conducted from America’s only deepwater supertanker offloading terminal, the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP). According to its website, LOOP has received more than 12 billion barrels of oil from foreign and domestic sources over the past three decades, but as an imports-only facility, it’s never been used to load an export cargo—until now.

If the trial run is successful, reports Bloomberg, “it will be a step change in America’s capacity to export the burgeoning production that’s roiled global oil markets.”

Oil Majors Reward Investors

All the extra oil supply might have some shareholders worried about lower prices and sinking profits, but for many major explorers and producers, profits have returned to the days when oil hovered above $100 a barrel. That’s the result, according to Bloomberg, “of CEOs’ focus on squeezing more from each dollar by stalling projects, renegotiating contracts and reducing the workforce.”

Big oil is generating as much profit as 60 dollars oil as it was at 100 dollars
click to enlarge

The opportunity for shareholders here lies in these companies maintaining or increasing their dividend payout while pledging share buybacks to offset shareholder dilution that occurred during the slump.

“The bosses of the world’s biggest oil companies are prioritizing investors over investments,” Bloomberg writes, “channeling the extra cash that comes from $60 crude into share buybacks and higher dividends.”

Curious about how you can participate in the new “golden age” of American energy? Click here!


All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

There is no guarantee that the issuers of any securities will declare dividends in the future or that, if declared, will remain at current levels or increase over time.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of 12/31/2017: Chevron Corp., Royal Dutch Shell PLC, Exxon Mobil Corp.


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Coming Housing Boom Could Mean It's Time to Add Raw Materials
December 20, 2017

Another housing boom

In its November report, mortgage security firm Freddie Mac called 2017 the “best year in a decade” for the housing market by a variety of measures. These include low inflation, strong job growth and historically-low mortgage rates. This assessment is very encouraging, not just for homebuyers and builders and the U.S. economy in general, but also for commodities, resources and raw materials as we head into 2018.

Although past performance is no guarantee of future results, it’s still instructive to look back at how materials performed the last time the U.S. was ramping up housing starts and mortgages. The last housing boom, which peaked in 2006, was accompanied by elevated commodity prices. We could see a return to these valuations over the next couple of years on higher demand, a stronger macroeconomic backdrop and cyclical fundamentals, as shown in the following chart courtesy of DoubleLine Capital:

equities versus commodities
click here to enlarge

Speaking on CNBC’s “Halftime Report” last week, DoubleLine founder Jeffrey Gundlach said he thought "investors should add commodities to their portfolios” for 2018, pointing out that they are just as cheap relative to stocks as they were at historical turning points.

“We’re at that level where in the past you would have wanted commodities” in your portfolio, Gundlach said. “The repetition of this is almost eerie. And so if you look at that chart, the value in commodities is, historically, exactly where you want it to be a buy.”

A Wealth of Positive Housing Data

There’s more to support the commodities narrative than cyclicality. 

For one, home builders right now are more confident of the future than they’ve been in over 18 years. December’s National Association of Home Builders (NAHB)/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index (HMI) soared to 74, eight points up from the November reading and its highest report since July 1999.

US home builder confidence soared to 18 year high in december
click here to enlarge

NAHB Chairman Granger MacDonald chalks up the incredible improvement in optimism to “new policies aimed at providing regulatory relief to the business community.” Other contributing factors include low unemployment rates, favorable demographics and a tight supply of existing home inventory.

In addition, new housing starts in November rose to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.3 million, up 3.3 percent from October and a strong 12.9 percent from a year ago.

This is all very constructive (no pun intended), as the market is still trying to recover nearly a decade following the subprime mortgage crisis.

Millennials, the Largest U.S. Generation, Finally Entering the Market

We’ve seen booms and busts in new housing starts over the past several decades, but homeownership rates in the U.S. took a huge blow as a result of the Great Recession. The rate dipped to a 51-year low of 62.9 percent in the second quarter of 2016, indicating buyers, especially first-time millennial buyers, are still struggling to save up for down payments.

a decade after the financial crisis US housing market still in recovery mode
click here to enlarge

Economists with the National Association of Realtors (NAR) note that student debt has played a massive role in delaying homeownership for young people, by as many as seven years on average. When asked how student loan debt has impacted their life decisions, more than seven in 10 millennials (those born roughly between 1980 and 1998) ranked “purchasing a home” as the most affected decision, followed by “taking a vacation.”

Since reaching its low last year, however, the homeownership rate has steadily improved, ending at 63.9 percent in the second quarter of 2017, a three-year high. This leads me to believe that the worst is behind us and that as the economy and labor market continue to improve, so too will demand for new homes. I also have high hopes that the tax cuts President Donald Trump signed into law today will encourage even more millennials, who have until now been sidelined, to join their older cohorts in owning a home.

Time to Add Commodities?

Indeed, all of the conditions appear ripe for another housing boom. Economic growth is on the upswing. The country is at near-full employment. Inflation and 30-year mortgage rates are also historically low.

When we factor in residential fixed investment and housing services, housing as a whole contributes between 15 and 18 percent to national gross domestic product (GDP). That’s a huge slice of the pie. And as I’ve pointed out before, housing has an extremely high multiplier effect. For every home that’s built, 2.97 full-time jobs and $162,080 in wages and salaries are created, according to a 2014 estimate by the NAHB. 

Beyond that, increased home demand is good news for resources and raw materials. According to home-construction services firm Happho, for every 1,000 square feet of new housing, nearly 8,820 pounds of steel are required, as well as 400 bags of cement, 1,800 cubic feet of sand and 1,350 cubic feet of gravel and other aggregate. This doesn’t begin to touch on finishers such as brick, paint and tiles, or fittings such as windows, doors, plumbing and electrical. You can see the full infographic by clicking here.

Interested in learning how you can participate in the growing housing market? Unsure how to gain exposure to raw materials and commodities?


All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

The S&P GSCI (formerly the Goldman Sachs Commodity Index) serves as a benchmark for investment in the commodity markets and as a measure of commodity performance over time. It is a tradable index that is readily available to market participants of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.

The Standard & Poor's 500, often abbreviated as the S&P 500, or just the S&P, is an American stock market index based on the market capitalizations of 500large companies having common stock listed on the NYSE or NASDAQ. The S&P 500 index components and their weightings are determined by S&P Dow Jones Indices.

The NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index gauges builder perceptions of current single-family home sales and sales expectations for the next six months as “good,” “fair” or “poor.” The survey also asks builders to rate traffic of prospective buyers as “high to very high,” “average” or “low to very low.” Scores for each component are then used to calculate a seasonally adjusted index where any number over 50 indicates that more builders view conditions as good than poor.

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Gobble, Gobble: Thanksgiving Dinners Stuffed with Savings Despite Rising Fuel Costs
November 27, 2017

Live turkeys

I spend a lot of time writing and talking about inflation, especially as it affects the price of gold, oil and other commodities and raw materials. The year-over-year percent change in the cost of living has been reasonably low for the past five years, averaging about 1.3 percent on a monthly basis. For commodities, the average change has been even lower at negative 0.9 percent, as measured by the producer price index (PPI). This hasn’t been too constructive for gold and oil producers, but it’s been a windfall for American consumers and manufacturers.

A helpful way to look at inflation is the changing cost of a typical Thanksgiving dinner for 10 people. For the second straight year, the cost actually declined from the previous year’s holiday, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF). This year’s feast, including staples such as turkey, rolls, sweet potatoes and more, fell $0.75 to a five-year low of $49.12. On an inflation-adjusted basis, that’s down more than $10 from 30 years ago. The turkey alone cost about 1.6 percent less than last year.

Cost of Thanksgiving dinner for 10 people 1986 to 2017
click to enlarge

So why’s this happening? Obviously there’s no shortage in demand for turkey, with an estimated 88 percent of American households enjoying it during last week’s Thanksgiving feast. U.S. turkey consumption, in fact, has nearly doubled over the past 25 years, according to the National Turkey Federation (NTF). As you might expect, this has led to an explosion in production over the same period, which has helped keep costs relatively stable for a generation.

On Friday, shares of Tyson Foods, one of the top processors of the poultry, were trading above $80, up more than 30 percent year-to-date.

Again, this is good news for consumers. Also good? Multiple studies have found that Americans gain only about a pound in weight as a result of engorging themselves on Thanksgiving Day. So don’t feel so guilty about having helped yourself to that extra slice of pumpkin pie.

Record Number of Americans Hit the Road and Take to the Skies

Holiday gasoline prices, however, are on the rise, with the cost per gallon rising to its highest level since 2014. A trip to the pump this past Thanksgiving will cost motorists an extra 18 percent compared to last year and nearly 25 percent more compared to 2015. 

Thanksgiving gas prices
click to enlarge

As I shared with you earlier this month, oil prices climbed to two-year highs following Saudi Arabia’s purge of princes and ministers. Markets also appear to be pricing in expectations that the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) will extend production cuts to the end of 2018.

West Texas Intermediate (WTI) was trading on Friday at a 52-week high of $59 a barrel. The next stop is $60, a level we haven’t seen since May 2015. In a strategy report last week, BCA Research recommended an overweight position in energy.

Higher fuel costs aren’t expected to discourage domestic travel, though. This Thanksgiving season, approximately 51 million Americans were projected to travel 50 miles or more from home on U.S. roads, highways, airlines, rails and waterways, according to the American Automobile Association (AAA). That’s up 3.3 percent from last year and the highest volume since 2005. President Donald Trump mentioned the impressive figure in a tweet last week, adding that “traffic and airports are running very smoothly!”

Trump tweets about travel

Looking at air travel alone, a record 28.5 million passengers were estimated to take to the skies this year during the 12-day Thanksgiving period, according to Airlines for America (A4A). That equates to an additional 2.38 million passengers a day.

Record number of passengers expected to fly on US carriers this Thanksgiving
click to enlarge

With the economy improving, incomes on the rise and consumer confidence at multiyear highs, airline executives expressed optimism in continued flight demand growth and profitability. According to October’s Airline Business Confidence Survey, conducted by the International Air Transport Association (IATA), 80 percent of airline chief financial officers (CFOs) said profits improved in the third quarter compared to the same three-month period in 2016. An overwhelming 87 percent were confident such profitability would persist or improve over the next 12 months. Eighty-six percent of CFOs reported increased passenger demand year-over-year in the third quarter, while 71 percent expected traffic volumes to rise a year from now.


Holiday Shopping Sales Could Exceed $107 Billion

On a final note, retailers were bracing for a blowout holiday shopping season. Earlier this month, Adobe Analytics released its forecast that U.S. sales during the Thanksgiving weekend and Cyber Monday could climb above $107 billion, a year-over-year increase of 13.8 percent. Cyber Monday alone might generate as much as $6.6 billion, 16.5 percent more than last year, making it the largest online sales day in history. Among the most hotly anticipated gift items this year are Apple Air Pods, home assistants (Amazon Echo and Google Home) and Sony PlayStation virtual reality (VR) headsets.

Looked at another way, more than 164 million consumers, or nearly 70 percent of all Americans, planned to shop during the Thanksgiving weekend and Cyber Monday, according to a survey conducted by the National Retail Federation (NRF). Today, Black Friday might have seen the largest volume of potential shoppers at 115 million, or 70 percent of those polled, followed by 78 million on Cyber Monday.  

More than 164 million consumers plan to shop during Thanksgiving weekend and cyber Monday
click to enlarge

So how could investors take advantage of these findings? According to a recent report from LPL Financial, since 2009 the S&P Retail Select Industry Index has seen the strongest gains during the months of February and March, after companies report sales for the fourth quarter. Retailers are actually down about 6 percent year-to-date, and LPL Financial adds that “it is likely that the performance of individual company stocks be more dispersed than they have been historically, which may favor active management in the sector moving forward.” I agree with this assessment, as we’ve seen quite a lot of volatility in the space.

I want to wish everyone a blessed week! I often say that having gratitude improves your altitude in life. It’s important that we take stock not only in our finances but also the people who matter most, from family and friends to coworkers and business associates.  

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

The Producer Price Index (PPI) is a weighted index of prices measured at the wholesale, or producer level. A monthly release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the PPI shows trends within the wholesale markets, manufacturing industries and commodities markets.

The S&P Retail Select Industry Index represents the retail sub-industry portion of the S&P Total Market Index (TMI). The S&P TMI tracks all the U.S. common stocks listed on the NYSE, AMEX, NASDAQ National Market and NASDAQ Small Cap exchanges. The Retail Index is a modified equal weight index.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of (09/30/2017): Tyson Foods Inc.

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Net Asset Value
as of 03/20/2018

Global Resources Fund PSPFX $6.05 No Change Gold and Precious Metals Fund USERX $7.10 -0.07 World Precious Minerals Fund UNWPX $4.29 -0.01 China Region Fund USCOX $12.41 0.28 Emerging Europe Fund EUROX $7.59 0.02 All American Equity Fund GBTFX $25.33 0.09 Holmes Macro Trends Fund MEGAX $19.76 0.09 Near-Term Tax Free Fund NEARX $2.20 No Change U.S. Government Securities Ultra-Short Bond Fund UGSDX $1.99 No Change