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Please note: The Frank Talk articles listed below contain historical material. The data provided was current at the time of publication. For current information regarding any of the funds mentioned in these presentations, please visit the appropriate fund performance page.

A New Wrinkle in the U.S.-China Trade Dispute
December 10, 2018

Frank in Washington at the Senate Press room

Last week I had the opportunity to attend the Young Presidents Organization (YPO) parliamentary intelligence forum in Washington, D.C. More than 200 members of parliaments from as many as 60 European countries joined us to hear from such dignitaries as Congressmen Robert Pittenger (R-NC) and Mike McCaul (R-TX), chairman of the Homeland Security Committee.

While in D.C., I was very honored to be invited into the epicenter of power and decision-making. That includes the Senate Press Office, pictured above, and the west front of the U.S. Capital facing the National Mall, where every president since Ronald Reagan in 1981 has been inaugurated.

It was there that George H.W. Bush took the oath of office, exactly 200 years after George Washington did. Newly arrived to Texas from Canada, I remember watching Bush’s inauguration on TV and being moved by his testament to freedom: “We know how to secure a more just and prosperous life for man on Earth,” he said, “through free markets, free speech, free elections and the exercise of free will unhampered by the state.”

The memory was made all the most poignant by the flags flying at half-staff, and the fact that I was standing in the same building where, just 24 hours earlier, the former president’s remains lied in state.

Remembering the 41st President

President George HW Bush 1924-2018

The life of George Bush, son of a U.S. senator and father of two governors and a president, stands as a case study in sacrifice and service. On the same day that he graduated from high school in 1942, he enlisted in the United States Navy. The country’s youngest Navy pilot at the time, Bush went on to receive the Distinguished Flying Cross after completing a bombing mission despite his plane being engulfed in flames from Japanese fire.

And from there it only gets more interesting.

Founder of a successful oil and gas company, congressman in the House of Representatives, ambassador to the United Nations, special envoy to the People’s Republic of China (before the U.S. had diplomatic relations with the Asian country), director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), two-term vice president—Bush was and remains to this day perhaps the most qualified and well-equipped chief executive ever to set foot in the Oval Office.

As the 41st president, he oversaw the collapse of the Soviet Union and reunification of Germany, putting him at odds with U.K. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and French President Francois Mitterrand, who favored a divided Germany. His decision to push back Iraqi forces from Kuwait, arguably the greatest defining moment of his one-term presidency, was both a military and political success.  

American voters ultimately denied him a second term, however, once they felt his pledge to create “no new taxes” went unfulfilled. As part of a compromise with the Democratic-controlled Congress, Bush agreed to raise taxes to help reduce the national deficit. The episode is a reminder of a time when politicians’ duty to country trumped duty to party, even if it jeopardized reelection.

That deep sense of duty sustained him for the rest of his 94 years. Bush was involved in a number of charities and humanitarian efforts, most notably the Bush Clinton Coastal Recovery Fund. The fund— spearheaded in cooperation with his former political rival and, some might say, unlikely friend Bill Clinton—raised tens of millions of dollars for families impacted by 2005’s Hurricane Katrina.

On behalf of everyone at U.S. Global Investors, I extend my gratitude and sympathy to the Bush family. May George Herbert Walker rest in peace and remain firmly in our memory.

Stocks Hit on Renewed U.S.-China Trade Concerns

On a very different note, global stocks last week plunged on concerns that trade negotiations between the U.S. and China are not running as smoothly as initially thought. The S&P 500 Index is not only having one of its worst quarters in years, but it could also end up in the red for the year for the first time since 2008.

Adding to the uncertainty was news of the arrest in Canada of the chief financial officer (CFO) of Chinese tech giant Huawei. Although no charges have been filed yet, the company has long been investigated by U.S. authorities, and more recently it’s been suspected of violating economic sanctions against Iran. The CFO, Meng Wanzhou, faces extradition to the U.S.

A Huawei smartphone

The name might not be known to most Americans, but Huawei is the world’s second-largest manufacturer of smartphones following Samsung, and the largest supplier of telecommunications equipment. Meng is not only a top executive but also the daughter of the company’s founder, Ren Zhengfei, a former officer in the People’s Liberation Army who has close ties to the Communist Party of China.

Imagine a foreign power arresting the daughter of Steve Jobs, and you might get some idea of how big a deal this is.

President Donald Trump has levied much of his criticism on China for “unfair” trade practices and stealing intellectual property from the U.S. As I told you back in March, China’s J-31 stealth fighter jet is believed to be a knockoff of Lockheed Martin’s F-35. (A 2014 whitepaper on Huawei, in fact, states that the tech firm got its start in 1987 by “reverse-engineering foreign products and using that as the foundation to develop more complex technologies.”) But America’s beef with Huawei, and its Hong Kong-listed rival ZTE, go back further than the start of this administration and rest on suspicions their phones and other telecomm products might be used for espionage.

In 2012, after investigating Huawei and ZTE, the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence concluded that the two firms could be seeking to “undermine core U.S. national-security interest.” Committee members recommended that the U.S. block any mergers and acquisitions involving the companies and that all U.S. governmental agencies not use their equipment. Earlier this year, officials with the CIA, National Security Agency (NSA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee that Huawei and ZTE’s phones posed a security risk to American consumers.       

In any case, Meng’s arrest last week rattled investors, convincing many of them that U.S.-China trade talks are deteriorating rather than improving. We saw a knock-on effect among a number of Huawei’s suppliers, including lens-maker Sunny Optical (down almost 5.5 percent last Thursday), data networking firm Inphi (off 9.25 percent) and California-based NeoPhotonics (down more than 16 percent).

U.S. Trade Deficit Just Widened Even More

Speaking of trade, the U.S. deficit with the rest of the world tumbled to a 10-year low in October. According to Zero Hedge, the “trade deficit was $55.5 billion in October (worse than the $55.0 billion expected and well down from the $54.6 billion revised print for September)… underscoring continued fallout from the trade dispute with China.”

As for the U.S.-China trade deficit—the difference between exports and imports—that measure widened to a new all-time low of $43.1 billion in October, down from $40.2 billion a month earlier. The fall in net exports is expected to weigh heavily on fourth-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) growth.

US trade deficit with China fell to a record low in October
click to enlarge

The trade report comes at a time when additional tariffs on goods coming into the U.S. are increasingly to blame for stock volatility this year. A new analysis by Bank of America Merrill Lynch suggests that worries about tariffs have trimmed some 6 percent off domestic stocks in 2018 alone.

What’s more, tariffs could be costing American households more than most realize. Last month a study conducted by consulting firm ImpactECON and commissioned by Koch Industries—an opponent of Trump’s trade policies despite its billionaire chief executive brothers, Charles and David, being top Republican donors—estimated that tariffs would cost each U.S. household nearly $2,400 in 2019, or $915 per person. GDP growth could be reduced 1.78 percent next year, with losses close to $2.8 trillion between now and 2030, if current trade actions were allowed to stay in place, the study says. As many as 2.75 million American workers “are likely to become unemployed” in 2019 “if all trade actions are implemented concurrently.”

Gold Price Rises on Weaker-Than-Expected Jobs Report

Speaking of employment, the U.S. added 155,000 jobs in November, falling far short of expectations. The U.S. dollar pulled back slightly as a result, prompting gold to trade at a five-month high of more than $1,255 per ounce. Earlier in the week, the price of palladium briefly overtook gold’s on tightening supply and increased automobile demand. (The silvery white metal is used to manufacture catalytic converters). But if economic uncertainty continues to weigh on the dollar, we could see gold lift even higher and safely retain its spot as the most valuable precious metal.

Palladium briefly became most precious metal for first time in 16 years
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As I reminder, I recommend that investors maintain a 10 percent exposure to gold in their portfolio—half of that in gold coins, bars and jewelry; the other half in high-quality gold mining stocks, mutual funds and ETFs. Remember to rebalance at least once a year.

Some links above may be directed to third-party websites. U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by these websites and is not responsible for their content. All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.

The S&P 500 Stock Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index of 500 common stock prices in U.S. companies.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of 09/30/2018: Sunny Optical Technology Group Co.

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This Holiday Season, Make It Silver and Gold
December 3, 2018

 

Yesterday evening marked the beginning of Hanukkah. The Jewish festival of lights commemorates the reclamation of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem from the Syrian-Greeks in the second century BCE. According to accounts, after Judah and his forces liberated the temple, he found only one jar of oil, good for a single day’s lighting at the most. Miraculously, though, the oil lasted for an incredible eight days, which is why Hanukkah is celebrated for eight days and nights to this day. To all of my Jewish friends around the world, I wish you a Hanukkah Sameach!

Among many of the holiday’s well-known traditions, at least here in the U.S., is to give children chocolate coins. This arose from the centuries-old practice of parents giving real coins, or Hanukkah gelt, to their kids, who in turn were expected to give them to their teachers.

I believe this is a beautiful custom. Whether you observe Hanukkah, Christmas, Eid al-Fitr, Diwali or any number of other religious holidays around the world, gifting your children and grandchildren coins of precious metals such as gold or silver could be made into a tradition in your own family. I encourage you to see the unique gifts that Kitco Metals offers in both silver and gold.

Holiday Deals at Your Local Coin Dealer

Take a look at silver. The white metal is on sale right now, trading at a little more than $14 an ounce. That’s the most affordable it’s been in three years. Not only does a silver coin cost quite a bit less than, say, a video game, it lasts much, much longer. And unlike a video game, it has the potential to rise in value.   

Silver at Its Most Affordable in Three Years
click to enlarge

Gold is admittedly more expensive, trading just under $1,240 as of today. But there again, if you’re already planning to go all out on gift shopping this holiday season, you might as well make it something that’s truly memorable, holds it value and lasts forever.

It need not be a coin. Pure, 24-karat gold jewelry holds its value just as well as a coin, and it has the added bonus of being wearable. I’ve told you about Menë, the newcomer that aims to disrupt the fine jewelry industry. The Toronto-based company just announced that it surpassed 10,000 orders from customers in more than 50 countries, all less than a year since going public in January 2018. 

Speaking of holding its value, notice how the price of gold has held up well against stock market volatility this year. Gold sentiment among some investors is room temperature right now, but it’s important to put things in perspective. Compared to some popular internet stocks, the metal’s losses have not been nearly as sharp or deep. From its 2018 peak in early April to today, gold has declined around 10 percent. Facebook, meanwhile, has dropped close to 40 percent since its peak at the end of July; Netflix, as much as 36 percent since June.

Gold Has Outperformed FAANG Stocks
click to enlarge

Has the U.S. Dollar Peaked?

With less than a month left to go in 2018, gold is down around 6 percent. If it stays in this range, gold will log its first year of negative returns since 2015. This is largely thanks to the U.S. dollar, which has strengthened on additional interest rate hikes.

Although it’s probably too early to call a peak, there are some indications that the dollar might be set to cool in 2019. This would allow gold, silver and other metals not only to appreciate in price but also potentially outperform stocks.

Among the most compelling signs that the dollar is close to a top comes from Dutch financial services group ING. According to its analysts, the ballooning U.S. twin deficit—which combines the government budget balance and the current account balance—is projected to weaken the U.S. currency as it did in past cycles.

U.S. Dollar Projected to Weaken on Ballooning Deficit
click to enlarge

As I’ve shared with you before, the government is set to run trillion-dollar deficits for the next four years, and this will likely prove to be a heavy burden on the dollar. “Unlike the dollar rally seen in the late-1990s, when a productivity boom helped deliver a budget surplus, this year’s dollar rally has been built on unfunded tax cuts,” ING’s strategists write. The group adds that it “expects funding these deficits to become more difficult.”

ING isn’t alone in its view. Bloomberg Intelligence Commodity Strategist Mike McGlone believes that the “trade-weighted broad dollar is near a peak and silver a bottom… and the potential for mean reversion should outweigh continuing-the-trend risks. Silver, among the most negatively correlated to the dollar and positively to industrial metals, appears ready for a potential longer-term recovery.”

Not One Ivy League Endowment Beat a Simple 60-40 Portfolio Over 10 Years

On a final note, a study last week showed that eight Ivy League endowments were unable to beat the 10-year annualized returns of a simple 60-40 portfolio, with 60 percent in U.S. stocks, 40 percent in bonds.

Markov Processes International (MPI), a quantitative analytics research firm, has been assessing the performance of endowment funds managed by some of the top universities in the U.S. Although all eight funds beat the 60-40 benchmark in fiscal year 2017, none managed to beat it on an annualized basis over the past 10 years. In fact, the 60-40 portfolio—one of the most common asset allocation structures, available to retail investors through a simple S&P 500 Index fund and fixed-income fund—outperformed the bottom university fund, Harvard’s, by 360 basis points.

Ivy League Endowments Were Unable to Beat a Simple 60-40 Portfolio
click to enlarge

The “Ivies” not only lagged the benchmark but were also accompanied by much higher risk. Over the past 10 years, the 60-40 portfolio had a standard deviation of 9.1 percent, whereas the riskier endowment funds had one as high as 13.8 percent (in the case of Yale and Cornell) and 13.6 percent (in the case of Harvard).

The implication, I believe, is you don’t necessarily need access to the fanciest, most sophisticated tools and strategies to maximize your investments. MPI shows that a basic portfolio, composed of high-quality domestic equity funds and short-term Treasury and municipal bond funds—all of which we’re proud to provide, I might add—is suitable for most retail investors seeking attractive risk-adjusted returns.

Curious to learn more? Watch my comprehensive interview with Kitco News’ Daniela Cambone by clicking here!

Some links above may be directed to third-party websites. U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by these websites and is not responsible for their content. All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.

Standard deviation is a quantity calculated to indicate the extent of deviation for a group as a whole. A trade-weighted dollar is a measurement of the foreign exchange value of the U.S. dollar compared against certain foreign currencies. A basis point is one hundredth of one percent, used chiefly in expressing different of interest rates.

The S&P 500 Stock Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index of 500 common stock prices in U.S. companies.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of 09/30/2018: Mene Inc.

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Talking Tech With Pulitzer Prize Nominee Michael Robinson
November 28, 2018

Michael Robinson, chief technology strategist of Money Map Press, is a lot of things: devoted son and father, technologist, avid skier and gun enthusiast, accomplished blues guitarist, Pulitzer Prize nominee.

Readers of his popular newsletters know him for his mantra, "The road to wealth is paved with tech.” As editor of Strategic Tech Investor, Nova-X Report and Radical Technology Profits, Michael has helped curious investors get in early on small-cap and micro-cap names involved in biotech, defense, cannabis research and more.

I got to see Michael’s presentation at the Black Diamond Investment Conference in October and was impressed by his energy, interesting life story and deep knowledge of niche markets.

Below are snippets from our recent discussion, which touches on topics ranging from trap shooting to cannabis legalization to blockchain technology.

Tell us about your start in military tech and biotech.

I grew up in a military household. My dad was a Marine Corps officer, and later he became the senior military editor at Aviation Week & Space Technology. He was among the earliest to write about the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), popularly known as Star Wars. So as a high schooler, I was exposed to all of these exotic defense technologies—materials, sensors, warheads and the like—which really gave me a leg up.

My dad and I ran a high-tech military newsletter in the 1980s. This put me in a position to visit Silicon Valley pretty regularly and talk with scientists and CEOs about cutting edge tech—materials that made battleships and submarines quieter, for example.

As a young auto analyst and reporter, I managed to break some big tech stories because I was willing to look away from the mainstream. The biggest story I did actually led to the firing of two executive vice presidents, which cost the bank close to $80 million. The New York Times and Wall Street Journal ended up having to cover the story, so that helped put me on the map.

I got involved in biotechnology later through my work at what was then the Oakland Tribune. The biotech sector was brand new in the mid-80s, and I was in California where it was all happening. While there, I did a five-part series on Betaseron, the first FDA-approved biotech drug to treat multiple sclerosis (MS).

How did you make the leap to the financial world?

That just felt like the natural next step. Every time I left a Silicon Valley presentation on some new tech, I would think: "That's really cool, but how can you make money off of it?" So even though I consider myself a technologist, I'm always looking at the financial angle.

What’s more, I served on the advisory board of a venture capital company. The experience gave me a different way of evaluating startups than a standard financial analyst, who might be trained only to do ratio analysis and things like that. There's nothing wrong with ratio analysis, but it's not going to give you the kinds of insights and instinct you need to figure out which companies really have it together and which don’t.

You’re known to have a strong interest in guns and shooting. Did that come out of your dad’s military background?

I never really thought of it that way. I just love shooting guns. Mostly these days I shoot trap and skeet. I joined the National Rifle Association (NRA) because I wanted to qualify as a Triple Distinguished Expert in pistols, rifles and shotguns. Shotgun was the most difficult, I thought.

The amount of concentration that's required to shoot at a high level really appeals to me. You have to block out all distractions. In that respect, shooting is a lot like investing. One of the things I remind readers and clients is to separate the signal from the noise. You can't become a good shot if you can't block out all the external distractions and things. Similarly, investors must learn to block out short-term market noise before they pull the trigger, so to speak.

Who would you say are your biggest influences?

Besides my dad, I would have to say the renowned economist Milton Friedman. I had the great pleasure to interview him once for the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). I remember he had a portrait of himself done, but his wife wouldn’t let him hang it up on the wall in their Nob Hill condo. It’s funny—here’s one of the world’s greatest economic thinkers, a Nobel Prize winner, and he had his portrait just sort of propped up in a corner somewhere.

In any case, Friedman was a huge influence on the way that I think about economics. In my freshman year when I was signing on to be an economics major, I remember reading about how iconoclastic he was, how out of step he was with the rest of the economics community, which was very Keynesian at the time. I learned the true value of contrarianism from studying him and looking at things like freedom to choose. Ayn Rand was another huge influence in that respect.

Michigan just voted to legalize recreational cannabis, making it the first Midwest state to do so. Is this a tipping point?

I think the tipping point probably occurred in 2016, when as many as nine states had cannabis legalization on their ballots. That year is also when we launched our investment report, the Roadmap to Marijuana Millions. All 30 of the stocks we recommended made money. The reason I say that is not to brag about our track record, but to point out that we saw large numbers of new investors coming in, willing to take the risk, wanting to be early and understand the industry.

Michigan, for me, was an affirmation of this critical mass. It’s also a reminder of what we need more of to attract institutional investors: initial public offerings (IPOs), mergers and acquisitions (M&As), up-listings to major exchanges.

Obviously the biggest catalyst would be something out of Washington—an effort to reclassify marijuana off of Schedule I, for instance. I would love to see that happen, as would my dad, the Marine Corps officer, but I don’t believe the support is there right now.

You recently argued that blockchain technology should not be used for voting, for reasons involving secrecy and anonymity. In what industries do you see its application making the most sense?

Literally everything. Supply chain management is a huge area that could benefit from blockchain. Look at the oil industry, which still uses this old paper-based system. Companies that have already shown interest in blockchain are British Petroleum (BP) and Royal Dutch Shell, among others.

Counterfeit goods is a problem that runs in the hundreds of billions of dollar every year. Blockchain can help with that. You can use it to tag and identify goods early on, and then they can be tracked with some kind of a distributed ledger.

Or look at financial services. Frank, you’ve pointed out a number of times before that JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon has criticized cryptocurrencies, and yet the bank was quietly investing millions upon millions.

Speaking of cryptocurrencies, they’re down significantly this year. Do you think now is a good time to buy, or is more pain ahead?

I fear about jumping in right now. Are we at the bottom of bitcoin? I don't know. One thing I do know is that this crypto selloff may be healthy in the long-term. There’s been an insane number of initial coin offerings (ICOs), which have really hurt bitcoin and Ethereum. We need to sweep out some of the smaller coins because 2,000 cryptos is more than the world can possibly absorb. There has to be a shakeout.

Total currency market capitalization
click to enlarge

You work on several newsletters. Can you describe them for our readers and explain what value they bring?

The main value they bring is making our readers a lot of money. For starters, we have Strategic Tech Investor, which is our free service. The idea is to give investors the rules they need to succeed and not be so emotionally-driven. Because it's free and it's open format, we want to educate investors, and hopefully they'll develop an interest in my investing style and decide to subscribe to one of our paid services.

That brings us to the Nova-X Report and Radical Technology Profits.

Nova-X focuses on mid-cap stocks and the lower end of large-caps. We feel that's a good comfort zone for entry-level investors who are looking for big trends and ways to make money that aren't necessarily household names. We try to get to market early.

Radical Tech is our premium service. It’s designed for much more savvy, much more aggressive people. We swing for the fences more than we do with Nova-X. The focus is on any kind of cutting-edge technology—small-caps and even some micro-caps.

As long as my readers make money, I know I'll do well. I take breaks from time to time, but for the most part I'm up well before dawn screening charts and looking at articles—anything to make our readers as much money as I can.

I want to thank Michael for his time and enthusiasm. Be sure to check out his newsletters!

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor. By clicking the link(s) above, you will be directed to a third-party website(s). U.S. Global Investors does not endorse all information supplied by this/these website(s) and is not responsible for its/their content.

Holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. The following securities mentioned in the article were held by one or more accounts managed by U.S. Global Investors as of 9/30/2018: BP PLC, Royal Dutch Shell PLC.

 

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Here's How We Discovered This Disruptive Gold Stock... Before It Went Public
November 14, 2018

If you’ve run into difficulties lately finding the best gold stocks to invest in, you’re not alone. Sentiment has been down. But there are still some very attractive opportunities out there in the goldfields, one of which I want to share with you.

First, a quick recap: The price of gold tested support of $1,200 an ounce on Monday as the U.S. dollar strengthened to a 16-month high, propelled by expectations of additional interest rate hikes. A stronger greenback, remember, weighs on gold as well as a number of other commodities, including oil, since they’re priced in dollars. I’ve inverted the dollar’s values in the chart below so it’s easier to see this relationship.

A strengthening U.S. Dollar has been a headwind for gold
click to enlarge

Gold miners have felt the pressure, too. In the 12-month period as of November 12, the FTSE Gold Mines Index, which reflects the stock performance of producers from around the world, lost 17.66 percent.

This may have made it challenging for some gold investors to find promising stocks. As such, assets have dropped. Gold and precious metal ETFs in North America saw net outflows of 58 metric tons in 2018 through October 31, according to the World Gold Council (WGC).

But selling now is the wrong move, I believe. Gold stocks appear to be highly undervalued relative to the S&P 500 Index, and a sharp drop in the market could strongly boost demand for the yellow metal. This means it might be time to consider accumulating.

Meet Menē, Gold Jewelry Disruptor

For investors who wish to increase their exposure to gold, I believe our Gold and Precious Metals Fund (USERX) is an attractive option with a history of strong performance. USERX is actively managed, meaning we rely on fundamentals and on cultivating relationships with management teams to decide which companies go in and out of the fund.

One of those companies, the one I hinted at earlier, is a newcomer to the industry—Menē Inc.

You might not have heard the name Menē yet, but you could soon enough, especially if you’re in the market for fine jewelry.

Founded in 2017 by Roy Sebag, co-founder of gold financial services firm Goldmoney, and Diana Widmaier-Picasso, granddaughter of—you guessed it—Pablo Picasso, Menē ’s mission is to disrupt the gold jewelry market by selling directly to the consumer and pricing its merchandise fairly and transparently. Unlike traditional sellers like Tiffany & Co. and Cartier, which sometimes have high premiums, Menē prices its jewelry based on the changing value of gold. It then charges a 15 percent to 20 percent design and production fee on top of that.

What also sets the company apart is that its jewelry—from earrings to necklaces, bracelets to charms—is made of 24-karat gold or platinum. No alloys, no insets of diamonds or other stones. That’s done to help the pieces retain their value over time.

Here at U.S. Global Investors, we believe gold is money and a timeless investment. Menē , which takes its name from the Aramaic word for “money,” has clearly run with that idea, going so far as to trademark the phrase “investment jewelry.”

It’s a business model that seems to have resonated with consumers and investors alike. In its first 10 months of operation, Menē did as much as $7 million in sales in more than 53 countries, as of October 2018.

Active Management Can Help You Invest in Attractive Companies Before the Street Does 

The reason I tell you this is to highlight our potential ability to find and invest in little-known yet promising companies before they become overvalued. In the case of Menē , we managed to get in even earlier, before shares in the company were made available to the public.

Menē went public on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX) earlier this month. But thanks to active management and our industry relationships, we were able to buy shares privately seven months ago. So even before its stock was available to retail investors, Menē accounted for 2.46 percent of the Gold and Precious Metals Fund (USERX) as of September 30.

For the one-year, five-year and 10-year periods, USERX beat its benchmark, the FTSE Gold Mines Index, as of September 30, 2018. You can see its performance here.

USERX holds an incredible four-star rating overall from Morningstar as of September 30 in the Equity Precious Metals category. It also holds four stars for the three-year, five-year and 10-year periods, based on risk-adjusted returns.

Learn more by visiting the Gold and Precious Metals Fund (USERX) now!

 

Please consider carefully a fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. For this and other important information, obtain a fund prospectus by visiting www.usfunds.com or by calling 1-800-US-FUNDS (1-800-873-8637). Read it carefully before investing. Foreside Fund Services, LLC, Distributor. U.S. Global Investors is the investment adviser.

Total Annualized Returns as 9/30/2018
Fund One-Year Three-Year Five-Year Ten-Year Gross
Expense
Ratio
Gold and Precious Metals Fund -16.56% 11.45% -1.43% -2.83% 1.86%
FTSE Gold Mines Index -21.33% 12.38% -4.34% -5.47% n/a

Expense ratios as stated in the most recent prospectus. Performance data quoted above is historical. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Results reflect the reinvestment of dividends and other earnings. For a portion of periods, the fund had expense limitations, without which returns would have been lower. Current performance may be higher or lower than the performance data quoted. The principal value and investment return of an investment will fluctuate so that your shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Performance does not include the effect of any direct fees described in the fund’s prospectus which, if applicable, would lower your total returns. Performance quoted for periods of one year or less is cumulative and not annualized. Obtain performance data current to the most recent month-end at www.usfunds.com or 1-800-US-FUNDS.

Morningstar Rating

Overall/67
3-Year/67
5-Year/65
10-Year/46

Morningstar ratings based on risk-adjusted return and number of funds
Category: Equity Precious Metals
Through: 9/30/2018

Morningstar Ratings are based on risk-adjusted return. The Morningstar Rating for a fund is derived from a weighted-average of the performance figures associated with its three-, five- and ten-year Morningstar Rating metrics. Past performance does not guarantee future results. For each fund with at least a three-year history, Morningstar calculates a Morningstar Rating based on a Morningstar Risk-Adjusted Return measure that accounts for variation in a fund’s monthly performance (including the effects of sales charges, loads, and redemption fees), placing more emphasis on downward variations and rewarding consistent performance. The top 10% of funds in each category receive 5 stars, the next 22.5% receive 4 stars, the next 35% receive 3 stars, the next 22.5% receive 2 stars and the bottom 10% receive 1 star. (Each share class is counted as a fraction of one fund within this scale and rated separately, which may cause slight variations in the distribution percentages.)

Gold, precious metals, and precious minerals funds may be susceptible to adverse economic, political or regulatory developments due to concentrating in a single theme. The prices of gold, precious metals, and precious minerals are subject to substantial price fluctuations over short periods of time and may be affected by unpredicted international monetary and political policies. We suggest investing no more than 5% to 10% of your portfolio in these sectors.

The S&P 500 Stock Index is a widely recognized capitalization-weighted index of 500 common stock prices in U.S. companies. The FTSE Gold Mines Index encompasses all gold mining companies that have a sustainable and attributable gold production of at least 300,000 ounces a year, and that derive 75% or more of their revenue from mined gold. The U.S. dollar index (USDX) is a measure of the value of the U.S. dollar relative to the value of a basket of currencies of the majority of the U.S.'s most significant trading partners. This index is similar to other trade-weighted indexes, which also use the exchange rates from the same major currencies.

Fund portfolios are actively managed, and holdings may change daily. Holdings are reported as of the most recent quarter-end. Holdings in the Gold and Precious Metals Fund as a percentage of net assets as of 9/30/2018: Menē Inc. 2.46%.

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.

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India's Booming Economy Expected to Firm Up Gold Demand
November 7, 2018

Gold and Diwali

Starting today, the five-day festival known as Diwali—literally, “a row of lights”—will be observed by millions of Hindus, Sikhs and Jains worldwide. A celebration of good triumphing over evil, the festival typically coincides with the Hindu new year. Regular readers of Frank Talk should know that Diwali is also an auspicious time to buy gold coins and jewelry as gifts for loved ones, and in the past the increased demand has been enough to move gold prices to the upside.

This year, however, demand for coins and jewelry was muted leading up to the fall festival on account of a weaker rupee relative to the U.S. dollar. This made the precious metal less affordable for some buyers. By the end of October, gold prices were at their highest level since September 2013, according to Reuters. Gold ordinarily goes for a premium in anticipation of Diwali, but this year many retailers reported trying to attract customers by offering discounts.

Price of gold surged in India on weaker rupee denting Diwali demand
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And there could be more rupee pain ahead. In a recent note to investors, UBS forecast that the Indian currency will likely remain under pressure as global oil prices stay elevated. India is a net importer of crude oil, which has risen more than 20 percent in the 12-month period, thanks to supply disruptions in Venezuela, Libya and elsewhere.

U.S. sanctions on major oil state Iran—India’s third largest supplier of crude following Iraq and Saudi Arabia—have also lifted prices. Those sanctions went into effect this week.

India’s Economy to Grow Faster Than China’s

Nevertheless, India’s economy is advancing at the world’s fastest pace right now. I believe this should have a positive effect on gold demand in the long term as the size of the country’s middle class expands. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) recently predicted the Indian economy this year to grow 7.3 percent, or 0.7 percentage points over China’s anticipated growth rate and an incredible 2.6 percentage points over emerging and developing economies on average. Next year India is expected to grow even faster, at 7.4 percent.

India projected to be fastest growing economy this year and next
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What’s more, India’s billionaire wealth increased 36 percent in 2017, according to a recent report by UBS. The number of billionaires in India rose by 19 to 119 in total. Again, I expect this to have a noticeable impact on gold demand, the greater this wealth builds.

Curious to learn more? Be sure to visit our slideshow:

 

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.

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Net Asset Value
as of 12/12/2018

Global Resources Fund PSPFX $4.59 0.03 Gold and Precious Metals Fund USERX $6.46 -0.01 World Precious Minerals Fund UNWPX $3.03 -0.02 China Region Fund USCOX $7.97 0.06 Emerging Europe Fund EUROX $6.18 -0.01 All American Equity Fund GBTFX $24.18 0.06 Holmes Macro Trends Fund MEGAX $18.17 0.13 Near-Term Tax Free Fund NEARX $2.19 No Change U.S. Government Securities Ultra-Short Bond Fund UGSDX $2.00 No Change